I love books, and I really enjoy reading. When I left grad school at UCSD I made a small promise to myself that I would take it easy on the non-ficton for pleasure from then on. For the most part I have done that, though I eventually venture into the dark side, so to speak. This list is an ongoing compilation of books I have read and suggest, for fun or educational purposes. Some are things I find myself constantly referring people to for good reason, others are more esoteric.

  • Ancient Wisdom Modern Kitchen

    This book, written by some of my professors, is a treasure. Not only does it contain great recipes, it also has many great insights about what to eat when you don't know what's right for you, like when you have a cold, or things (in your body) aren't working or feeling quite right.
  • The Web That Has No Weaver

    A wonderfully written and engaging book about Oriental medicine. Written by the teacher of one of my teachers, this book has lots of interesting ideas within, many of which would appeal to just about anyone. Among other subjects, it presents interesting insight into the interface of eastern and western medical approaches.
  • A Tooth from the Tiger's Mouth

    A fun - if you can say that - book about healing from injury. It builds character!
  • A History of Western Philosophy

    One of the few books I have read multiple times. Mind-blowingly interesting, you will forget it's non-fiction and be left wondering what is considered to be so opaque about philosophy. I love this book because it is at once a history of culture, philosophy, and great story.
  • Personal Knowledge

    In many ways this book to me is part of a series, to be enjoyed in some sort of succession, with a much more difficult though equally engaging book, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Personal Knowledge discusses how we know what we know and why we believe what we believe and, in this way it is relevant to acupuncture, this thing that definitely works, though we aren't totally sure how.
  • Structure of Scientific Revolutions

    Your mind will be blown...
  • Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact

    A case study in the understanding of disease (syphilis specifically), this book looks at how scientific fact is as much of a made-up thing as fiction can be. A foundational text in the history of medicine, this book remains relevant to any quest for knowledge.
  • The Leopard (Il Gattopardo)

    One of my most favorite books, and a very cheap trip to southern Italy. Lampedusa is an amazing writer who wasn't all that prolific directly, but was influenced by Stendhal and himself influenced many others.